Accelerated, first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing, and k-space weighted image contrast reconstruction tailored for visual analysis and quantification of myocardial blood flow

Nivedita K. Naresh, Hassan Haji-Valizadeh, Pascale J. Aouad, Matthew J. Barrett, Kelvin Chow, Ann B Ragin, Jeremy D. Collins, James Carr, Daniel C Lee, Daniel Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To develop an accelerated cardiac perfusion pulse sequence and test whether it is capable of increasing spatial coverage, generating high-quality images, and enabling quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). Methods: We implemented an accelerated first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence by combining radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing (CS), and k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) filtering. The proposed and clinical standard pulse sequences were evaluated in a randomized order in 13 patients at rest. For visual analysis, 3 readers graded the conspicuity of wall enhancement, artifact, and noise level on a 5-point Likert scale (overall score index = sum of 3 individual scores). Resting MBF was calculated using a Fermi function model with and without KWIC filtering. Mean visual scores and MBF values were compared between sequences using appropriate statistical tests. Results: The proposed pulse sequence produced greater spatial coverage (6–8 slices) with higher spatial resolution (1.6 × 1.6 × 8 mm 3 ) and shorter readout duration (78 ms) compared to clinical standard (3–4 slices, 3 × 3 × 8 mm 3 , 128 ms, respectively). The overall image score index between accelerated (11.1 ± 1.3) and clinical standard (11.2 ± 1.3) was not significantly different (P = 0.64). Mean resting MBF values with KWIC filtering (0.9–1.2 mL/g/min across different slices) were significantly lower (P < 0.0001) than those without KWIC filtering (3.1–4.3 mL/g/min) and agreed better with values reported in literature. Conclusion: An accelerated, first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling, CS, and KWIC filtering is capable of increasing spatial coverage, generating high-quality images, and enabling quantification of MBF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2632-2643
Number of pages12
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Computer-Assisted Image Processing
Perfusion
Artifacts
Noise

Keywords

  • MRI
  • cardiac perfusion
  • quantitative perfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Accelerated, first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing, and k-space weighted image contrast reconstruction tailored for visual analysis and quantification of myocardial blood flow",
abstract = "Purpose: To develop an accelerated cardiac perfusion pulse sequence and test whether it is capable of increasing spatial coverage, generating high-quality images, and enabling quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). Methods: We implemented an accelerated first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence by combining radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing (CS), and k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) filtering. The proposed and clinical standard pulse sequences were evaluated in a randomized order in 13 patients at rest. For visual analysis, 3 readers graded the conspicuity of wall enhancement, artifact, and noise level on a 5-point Likert scale (overall score index = sum of 3 individual scores). Resting MBF was calculated using a Fermi function model with and without KWIC filtering. Mean visual scores and MBF values were compared between sequences using appropriate statistical tests. Results: The proposed pulse sequence produced greater spatial coverage (6–8 slices) with higher spatial resolution (1.6 × 1.6 × 8 mm 3 ) and shorter readout duration (78 ms) compared to clinical standard (3–4 slices, 3 × 3 × 8 mm 3 , 128 ms, respectively). The overall image score index between accelerated (11.1 ± 1.3) and clinical standard (11.2 ± 1.3) was not significantly different (P = 0.64). Mean resting MBF values with KWIC filtering (0.9–1.2 mL/g/min across different slices) were significantly lower (P < 0.0001) than those without KWIC filtering (3.1–4.3 mL/g/min) and agreed better with values reported in literature. Conclusion: An accelerated, first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling, CS, and KWIC filtering is capable of increasing spatial coverage, generating high-quality images, and enabling quantification of MBF.",
keywords = "MRI, cardiac perfusion, quantitative perfusion",
author = "Naresh, {Nivedita K.} and Hassan Haji-Valizadeh and Aouad, {Pascale J.} and Barrett, {Matthew J.} and Kelvin Chow and Ragin, {Ann B} and Collins, {Jeremy D.} and James Carr and Lee, {Daniel C} and Daniel Kim",
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Accelerated, first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing, and k-space weighted image contrast reconstruction tailored for visual analysis and quantification of myocardial blood flow. / Naresh, Nivedita K.; Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Aouad, Pascale J.; Barrett, Matthew J.; Chow, Kelvin; Ragin, Ann B; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James; Lee, Daniel C; Kim, Daniel.

In: Magnetic resonance in medicine, Vol. 81, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. 2632-2643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accelerated, first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing, and k-space weighted image contrast reconstruction tailored for visual analysis and quantification of myocardial blood flow

AU - Naresh, Nivedita K.

AU - Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan

AU - Aouad, Pascale J.

AU - Barrett, Matthew J.

AU - Chow, Kelvin

AU - Ragin, Ann B

AU - Collins, Jeremy D.

AU - Carr, James

AU - Lee, Daniel C

AU - Kim, Daniel

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Purpose: To develop an accelerated cardiac perfusion pulse sequence and test whether it is capable of increasing spatial coverage, generating high-quality images, and enabling quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). Methods: We implemented an accelerated first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence by combining radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing (CS), and k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) filtering. The proposed and clinical standard pulse sequences were evaluated in a randomized order in 13 patients at rest. For visual analysis, 3 readers graded the conspicuity of wall enhancement, artifact, and noise level on a 5-point Likert scale (overall score index = sum of 3 individual scores). Resting MBF was calculated using a Fermi function model with and without KWIC filtering. Mean visual scores and MBF values were compared between sequences using appropriate statistical tests. Results: The proposed pulse sequence produced greater spatial coverage (6–8 slices) with higher spatial resolution (1.6 × 1.6 × 8 mm 3 ) and shorter readout duration (78 ms) compared to clinical standard (3–4 slices, 3 × 3 × 8 mm 3 , 128 ms, respectively). The overall image score index between accelerated (11.1 ± 1.3) and clinical standard (11.2 ± 1.3) was not significantly different (P = 0.64). Mean resting MBF values with KWIC filtering (0.9–1.2 mL/g/min across different slices) were significantly lower (P < 0.0001) than those without KWIC filtering (3.1–4.3 mL/g/min) and agreed better with values reported in literature. Conclusion: An accelerated, first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling, CS, and KWIC filtering is capable of increasing spatial coverage, generating high-quality images, and enabling quantification of MBF.

AB - Purpose: To develop an accelerated cardiac perfusion pulse sequence and test whether it is capable of increasing spatial coverage, generating high-quality images, and enabling quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). Methods: We implemented an accelerated first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence by combining radial k-space sampling, compressed sensing (CS), and k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) filtering. The proposed and clinical standard pulse sequences were evaluated in a randomized order in 13 patients at rest. For visual analysis, 3 readers graded the conspicuity of wall enhancement, artifact, and noise level on a 5-point Likert scale (overall score index = sum of 3 individual scores). Resting MBF was calculated using a Fermi function model with and without KWIC filtering. Mean visual scores and MBF values were compared between sequences using appropriate statistical tests. Results: The proposed pulse sequence produced greater spatial coverage (6–8 slices) with higher spatial resolution (1.6 × 1.6 × 8 mm 3 ) and shorter readout duration (78 ms) compared to clinical standard (3–4 slices, 3 × 3 × 8 mm 3 , 128 ms, respectively). The overall image score index between accelerated (11.1 ± 1.3) and clinical standard (11.2 ± 1.3) was not significantly different (P = 0.64). Mean resting MBF values with KWIC filtering (0.9–1.2 mL/g/min across different slices) were significantly lower (P < 0.0001) than those without KWIC filtering (3.1–4.3 mL/g/min) and agreed better with values reported in literature. Conclusion: An accelerated, first-pass cardiac perfusion pulse sequence with radial k-space sampling, CS, and KWIC filtering is capable of increasing spatial coverage, generating high-quality images, and enabling quantification of MBF.

KW - MRI

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KW - quantitative perfusion

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