Acceptability of Antiretroviral Pre-exposure Prophylaxis from a Cohort of Sexually Experienced Young Transgender Women in Two U.S. Cities

Arjee J. Restar, Lisa Kuhns, Sari L. Reisner, Adedotun Ogunbajo, Robert Garofalo, Matthew J. Mimiaga*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can prevent HIV infection among at-risk individuals, including young transgender women (YTW). We used baseline data from 230 HIV-uninfected YTW (ages 16–29 years) who were enrolled in Project LifeSkills during 2012–2015. We examined factors associated with perceived acceptability of PrEP use (mean score = 23.4, range 10.0–30.0). Participants were largely transgender women of color (67%) and had a mean age of 23 years (SD = 3.5). In an adjusted multiple linear regression model, PrEP interest (β = 3.7, 95% CI 2.2–5.2) and having a medical provider who meets their health needs (β = 2.9, 95% CI 1.3–4.4) was associated with higher PrEP acceptability scores, whereas younger age (21–25 vs 26–29 years) (β = –2.0, 95% CI − 3.6 to − 0.4) and reporting transactional sex in the past 4 months (β = − 1.5, 95% CI − 3.0 to − 0.1) was associated with lower PrEP acceptability scores (all p values < 0.05). Enhancing PrEP-related interventions by addressing the unique barriers to uptake among YTW of younger age or those with history of transactional sex could bolster PrEP acceptability for this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3649-3657
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Keywords

  • HIV prevention
  • Pre-exposure prophylaxis
  • Transgender women
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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