Accounting for jokes: Jocular performance in a critical age

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6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this essay, drawing on the research of Elizabeth and Jay Mechling we focus on the politics of joking and examine the ways in which jokes and joke-telling serve complex political ends. To do this, we provide examples from focus groups, interviews, and popular culture. We attempt to draw lines between those jokes that contribute to a toxic racial environment and other jokes, referencing secondary racial characteristics, that have the potential for creating an integrated community of laughter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-321
Number of pages23
JournalWestern Folklore
Volume69
Issue number3-4
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Keywords

  • Civil society
  • Humor
  • Joking
  • Politics
  • Popular culture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • History
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts

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