Acculturation is associated with asthma burden and pulmonary function in Latino youth

The GALA II study

Neeta Thakur*, Luisa N. Borrell, Morgan Ye, Sam S. Oh, Celeste Eng, Kelley Meade, Pedro C. Avila, Harold J. Farber, Denise Serebrisky, Emerita Brigino-Buenaventura, William Rodriguez-Cintron, Rajesh Kumar, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, Shannon Thyne, Saunak Sen, Jose R. Rodriguez-Santana, Esteban G. Burchard

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Acculturation is an important predictor of asthma in Latino youth, specifically Mexican Americans. Less is known about acculturation and pulmonary function measures. Objective: We sought to estimate the association of acculturation measures with asthma and pulmonary function in Latino youth and determine whether this association varies across Latino subgroups. Methods: We included 1849 Latinos (302 Caribbean Spanish, 193 Central or South Americans, 1136 Mexican Americans, and 218 other Latino children)aged 8 to 21 years from 4 urban regions in the United States. Acculturation measures include nativity status, age of immigration, language of preference, and generation in the United States. We used multivariable logistic and linear regression models to quantify the association of acculturation factors with the presence of asthma (case-control study)and pulmonary function (case-only study), adjusting for demographic, socioenvironmental, and clinical variables. Results: For all acculturation measures (nativity status, age of immigration, language of preference, and generation in the United States), greater levels of acculturation were associated with greater odds of asthma. Among cases, high (English preference)and medium (equal preference for Spanish and English)levels of language acculturation were associated with decreased bronchodilator response compared with low (Spanish preference)levels (P =.009 and.02, respectively). Similarly, high language acculturation was associated with increased FEV 1 compared with low language acculturation (P =.02). There was insufficient evidence of heterogeneity for associations across Latino subgroups. Conclusions: Acculturation was associated with diagnosed asthma and pulmonary function in Latino children and is an important factor to consider in the management of Latino youth with asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1914-1922
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume143
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Acculturation
Hispanic Americans
Asthma
Lung
Language
Emigration and Immigration
Linear Models
Bronchodilator Agents
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models
Demography

Keywords

  • Latino
  • acculturation
  • asthma
  • health disparities
  • pediatric
  • social determinants of health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Thakur, Neeta ; Borrell, Luisa N. ; Ye, Morgan ; Oh, Sam S. ; Eng, Celeste ; Meade, Kelley ; Avila, Pedro C. ; Farber, Harold J. ; Serebrisky, Denise ; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita ; Rodriguez-Cintron, William ; Kumar, Rajesh ; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten ; Thyne, Shannon ; Sen, Saunak ; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R. ; Burchard, Esteban G. / Acculturation is associated with asthma burden and pulmonary function in Latino youth : The GALA II study. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2019 ; Vol. 143, No. 5. pp. 1914-1922.
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abstract = "Background: Acculturation is an important predictor of asthma in Latino youth, specifically Mexican Americans. Less is known about acculturation and pulmonary function measures. Objective: We sought to estimate the association of acculturation measures with asthma and pulmonary function in Latino youth and determine whether this association varies across Latino subgroups. Methods: We included 1849 Latinos (302 Caribbean Spanish, 193 Central or South Americans, 1136 Mexican Americans, and 218 other Latino children)aged 8 to 21 years from 4 urban regions in the United States. Acculturation measures include nativity status, age of immigration, language of preference, and generation in the United States. We used multivariable logistic and linear regression models to quantify the association of acculturation factors with the presence of asthma (case-control study)and pulmonary function (case-only study), adjusting for demographic, socioenvironmental, and clinical variables. Results: For all acculturation measures (nativity status, age of immigration, language of preference, and generation in the United States), greater levels of acculturation were associated with greater odds of asthma. Among cases, high (English preference)and medium (equal preference for Spanish and English)levels of language acculturation were associated with decreased bronchodilator response compared with low (Spanish preference)levels (P =.009 and.02, respectively). Similarly, high language acculturation was associated with increased FEV 1 compared with low language acculturation (P =.02). There was insufficient evidence of heterogeneity for associations across Latino subgroups. Conclusions: Acculturation was associated with diagnosed asthma and pulmonary function in Latino children and is an important factor to consider in the management of Latino youth with asthma.",
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author = "Neeta Thakur and Borrell, {Luisa N.} and Morgan Ye and Oh, {Sam S.} and Celeste Eng and Kelley Meade and Avila, {Pedro C.} and Farber, {Harold J.} and Denise Serebrisky and Emerita Brigino-Buenaventura and William Rodriguez-Cintron and Rajesh Kumar and Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo and Shannon Thyne and Saunak Sen and Rodriguez-Santana, {Jose R.} and Burchard, {Esteban G.}",
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Thakur, N, Borrell, LN, Ye, M, Oh, SS, Eng, C, Meade, K, Avila, PC, Farber, HJ, Serebrisky, D, Brigino-Buenaventura, E, Rodriguez-Cintron, W, Kumar, R, Bibbins-Domingo, K, Thyne, S, Sen, S, Rodriguez-Santana, JR & Burchard, EG 2019, 'Acculturation is associated with asthma burden and pulmonary function in Latino youth: The GALA II study', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 143, no. 5, pp. 1914-1922. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2018.12.1015

Acculturation is associated with asthma burden and pulmonary function in Latino youth : The GALA II study. / Thakur, Neeta; Borrell, Luisa N.; Ye, Morgan; Oh, Sam S.; Eng, Celeste; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Farber, Harold J.; Serebrisky, Denise; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Kumar, Rajesh; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Thyne, Shannon; Sen, Saunak; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 143, No. 5, 01.05.2019, p. 1914-1922.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acculturation is associated with asthma burden and pulmonary function in Latino youth

T2 - The GALA II study

AU - Thakur, Neeta

AU - Borrell, Luisa N.

AU - Ye, Morgan

AU - Oh, Sam S.

AU - Eng, Celeste

AU - Meade, Kelley

AU - Avila, Pedro C.

AU - Farber, Harold J.

AU - Serebrisky, Denise

AU - Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita

AU - Rodriguez-Cintron, William

AU - Kumar, Rajesh

AU - Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

AU - Thyne, Shannon

AU - Sen, Saunak

AU - Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.

AU - Burchard, Esteban G.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Background: Acculturation is an important predictor of asthma in Latino youth, specifically Mexican Americans. Less is known about acculturation and pulmonary function measures. Objective: We sought to estimate the association of acculturation measures with asthma and pulmonary function in Latino youth and determine whether this association varies across Latino subgroups. Methods: We included 1849 Latinos (302 Caribbean Spanish, 193 Central or South Americans, 1136 Mexican Americans, and 218 other Latino children)aged 8 to 21 years from 4 urban regions in the United States. Acculturation measures include nativity status, age of immigration, language of preference, and generation in the United States. We used multivariable logistic and linear regression models to quantify the association of acculturation factors with the presence of asthma (case-control study)and pulmonary function (case-only study), adjusting for demographic, socioenvironmental, and clinical variables. Results: For all acculturation measures (nativity status, age of immigration, language of preference, and generation in the United States), greater levels of acculturation were associated with greater odds of asthma. Among cases, high (English preference)and medium (equal preference for Spanish and English)levels of language acculturation were associated with decreased bronchodilator response compared with low (Spanish preference)levels (P =.009 and.02, respectively). Similarly, high language acculturation was associated with increased FEV 1 compared with low language acculturation (P =.02). There was insufficient evidence of heterogeneity for associations across Latino subgroups. Conclusions: Acculturation was associated with diagnosed asthma and pulmonary function in Latino children and is an important factor to consider in the management of Latino youth with asthma.

AB - Background: Acculturation is an important predictor of asthma in Latino youth, specifically Mexican Americans. Less is known about acculturation and pulmonary function measures. Objective: We sought to estimate the association of acculturation measures with asthma and pulmonary function in Latino youth and determine whether this association varies across Latino subgroups. Methods: We included 1849 Latinos (302 Caribbean Spanish, 193 Central or South Americans, 1136 Mexican Americans, and 218 other Latino children)aged 8 to 21 years from 4 urban regions in the United States. Acculturation measures include nativity status, age of immigration, language of preference, and generation in the United States. We used multivariable logistic and linear regression models to quantify the association of acculturation factors with the presence of asthma (case-control study)and pulmonary function (case-only study), adjusting for demographic, socioenvironmental, and clinical variables. Results: For all acculturation measures (nativity status, age of immigration, language of preference, and generation in the United States), greater levels of acculturation were associated with greater odds of asthma. Among cases, high (English preference)and medium (equal preference for Spanish and English)levels of language acculturation were associated with decreased bronchodilator response compared with low (Spanish preference)levels (P =.009 and.02, respectively). Similarly, high language acculturation was associated with increased FEV 1 compared with low language acculturation (P =.02). There was insufficient evidence of heterogeneity for associations across Latino subgroups. Conclusions: Acculturation was associated with diagnosed asthma and pulmonary function in Latino children and is an important factor to consider in the management of Latino youth with asthma.

KW - Latino

KW - acculturation

KW - asthma

KW - health disparities

KW - pediatric

KW - social determinants of health

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jaci.2018.12.1015

DO - 10.1016/j.jaci.2018.12.1015

M3 - Article

VL - 143

SP - 1914

EP - 1922

JO - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN - 0091-6749

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ER -