Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression

The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study

Belinda L. Needham*, Bhramar Mukherjee, Pramita Bagchi, Catherine Kim, Arnab Mukherjea, Namratha R Kandula, Alka M. Kanaya

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Using latent class analysis, we previously identified three acculturation strategies employed by South Asian immigrants in the US. Members of the Separation class showed a preference for South Asian culture over US culture, while members of the Assimilation class showed a preference for US culture, and those in the Integration class showed a similar preference for South Asian and US cultures. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between these acculturation strategies and symptoms of depression, a common yet underdiagnosed and undertreated mental disorder. We used data from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study (n = 856). Data were collected between October 2010 and March 2013 in the San Francisco Bay Area and Chicago. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the CES-D Scale. Applying a simple new method to account for uncertainty in class assignment when modeling latent classes as an exposure, we found that respondents in the Separation class had more depressive symptoms than those in the Integration class, but only after taking into account self-reported social support (b = 0.11; p = 0.05). There were no differences in depressive symptoms among those in the Assimilation class vs. those in the Integration class (b = −0.06; p = 0.41). Social support may protect against elevated symptoms of depression in South Asian immigrants with lower levels of integration into US culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)792-798
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Atherosclerosis
Depression
Social Support
San Francisco
Mental Disorders
Uncertainty

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • South Asian immigrants
  • Symptoms of depression
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Needham, Belinda L. ; Mukherjee, Bhramar ; Bagchi, Pramita ; Kim, Catherine ; Mukherjea, Arnab ; Kandula, Namratha R ; Kanaya, Alka M. / Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression : The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 792-798.
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Acculturation Strategies and Symptoms of Depression : The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. / Needham, Belinda L.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Bagchi, Pramita; Kim, Catherine; Mukherjea, Arnab; Kandula, Namratha R; Kanaya, Alka M.

In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.08.2018, p. 792-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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