ACCURACY OF PERCEIVED BREAST CANCER RISK IN BLACK AND WHITE WOMEN WITH AN ELEVATED RISK

Jessica M.L. Young, Kristen J. Vogel Postula, Debra Duquette, Melissa Gutierrez-Kapheim, Vivian Pan, Maria C. Katapodi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Perceived breast cancer risk predicts screening behaviors. However, perceived risk is often inaccurate, notably in Black women, who often underestimate their risk despite having higher disease-specific mortality rates. We examined predictors of perceived breast cancer risk, and its impact on surveillance. Methods: We used baseline data from a randomized trial targeting unaffected women recruited by relatives with early-onset breast cancer. Data collection occurred between 2012 and 2013. Accuracy of perceived risk was assessed by comparing perceived risk to objective lifetime breast cancer risks, calculated with the Gail and Claus models. A multivariate mixed model regression examined predictors of accuracy of perceived risk. The impact of perceived risk on breast cancer surveillance was assessed with one-way ANOVAS comparing Black to White women. Results: Among participants, 21.4% self-identified as Black and 78.6% as White. Overall, 72.9% (n=247/339), 16.2% (n=55/339), and 10.9% (n=37/339) of participants overestimated, accurately perceived, and underestimated, respectively, their lifetime breast cancer risk. Race did not predict the accuracy of risk perception. Younger participants were more likely to overestimate their risk (β=-.455; CI [-.772, -.138]; P= .005). MRI utilization was predicted by a higher objective risk (F 1,263 [= 30.271]; P < .001) and more accurate risk perception (P= .010; Fisher's exact test). Conclusions: Most women with a family history of early-onset breast cancer inaccurately perceived their risk for developing the disease. Younger women were more likely to overestimate their risk. Findings can guide the development of tailored interventions to improve adherence to breast cancer surveillance recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-90
Number of pages10
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Early-onset Breast Cancer
  • Family History
  • Health Disparities
  • Surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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