Acetylcholinesterase‐rich pyramidal neurons in the human neocortex and hippocampus: Absence at birth, development during the life span, and dissolution in Alzheimer's disease

M. ‐Marchsel Mesulam*, Changiz Geula

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

Acetylcholinesterase‐rich pyramidal neurons in the human association neocortex and hippocampal formation are virtually absent early in life, become established by adolescence, and appear to increase in density during adulthood and perhaps even senescence. Analogous neurons are not detectable in the adult monkey brain. This Novemberel class of neurons may represent a uniquely human adaptation in primate evolution and may provide a neuroanatomical substrate for the mental development that occurs during the adult stages of life. These phylogenetically and ontogenetically progressive neurons are also Marchkedly vulnerable to degeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)765-773
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of neurology
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Acetylcholinesterase‐rich pyramidal neurons in the human neocortex and hippocampus: Absence at birth, development during the life span, and dissolution in Alzheimer's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this