Active Coping and Perceived Social Support Mediate the Relationship Between Physical Health and Resilience in Liver Transplant Candidates

Amelia Swanson*, Jessica Geller, Kelly DeMartini, Anne Fernandez, Dwain Fehon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Without a transplant, end-stage liver disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Transplant candidates endure physical and psychological stress while awaiting surgery, yet little is known about the relationship between physical health and psychological resilience during the wait-list period. This study examined predictors of psychological resilience and mediators of the relationship between physical health and psychological resilience in liver transplant candidates. Wait-listed candidates (N = 120) from a single Northeast transplant center completed assessments of physical functioning, coping, perceived social support, and resilience. Findings revealed that physical functioning, active coping, and perceived social support were positively associated with resilience; maladaptive coping was negatively associated with resilience. Perceived social support and active coping partially mediated the relationship between physical functioning and resilience. Transplant center care providers should promote active coping skills and reinforce the importance of effective social support networks. These interventions could increase psychological resilience among liver transplant candidates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-496
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Liver disease
  • Liver transplant
  • Resilience
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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