ACTOR-CRITIC PROVABLY FINDS NASH EQUILIBRIA OF LINEAR-QUADRATIC MEAN-FIELD GAMES

Zuyue Fu, Zhuoran Yang, Yongxin Chen, Zhaoran Wang

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

We study discrete-time mean-field Markov games with infinite numbers of agents where each agent aims to minimize its ergodic cost. We consider the setting where the agents have identical linear state transitions and quadratic cost functions, while the aggregated effect of the agents is captured by the population mean of their states, namely, the mean-field state. For such a game, based on the Nash certainty equivalence principle, we provide sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of its Nash equilibrium. Moreover, to find the Nash equilibrium, we propose a mean-field actor-critic algorithm with linear function approximation, which does not require knowing the model of dynamics. Specifically, at each iteration of our algorithm, we use the single-agent actor-critic algorithm to approximately obtain the optimal policy of the each agent given the current mean-field state, and then update the mean-field state. In particular, we prove that our algorithm converges to the Nash equilibrium at a linear rate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first success of applying model-free reinforcement learning with function approximation to discrete-time mean-field Markov games with provable non-asymptotic global convergence guarantees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - 2020
Event8th International Conference on Learning Representations, ICLR 2020 - Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Duration: Apr 30 2020 → …

Conference

Conference8th International Conference on Learning Representations, ICLR 2020
Country/TerritoryEthiopia
CityAddis Ababa
Period4/30/20 → …

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Computer Science Applications

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