Adaptation and Construct Validity Evaluation of a Tablet-Based, Short Neuropsychological Test Battery for Use With Adolescents and Young Adults Living With HIV in Thailand

Reuben N. Robbins*, Anthony F. Santoro, Christopher Ferraris, Nana Asiedu, Jun Liu, Curtis Dolezal, Kathleen M. Malee, Claude A. Mellins, Robert Paul, Kulvadee Thongpibul, Thanyawee Puthanakit, Linda Aurpibul

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Deficits in neurocognitive functioning are common among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with perinatally acquired HIV (PHIV). Limitations of traditional neuropsychological tests hinder assessment of neurocognition in low and middle-income countries where most AYA with PHIV reside. Computerized testing could make assessment of neurocognition more accessible in these countries. This study examined a culturally modified NeuroScreen, a tablet-based neurocognitive testing app, for use in Thailand. Construct validity was examined among Thai AYA (13–23 years) with and without PHIV. Method: NeuroScreen underwent adaptation including language, content, and usability review by Thai psychologists, AYA, and clinical staff. One hundred Thai AYA (50 PHIV; 50 HIV-uninfected, matched controls) were administered the adapted NeuroScreen and a battery of traditional paper-and-pencil neuropsychological tests. Correlations, mean differences, and proportions with impaired performance were examined across NeuroScreen and the traditional tests. Results: The Thai version of NeuroScreen was deemed understandable and culturally appropriate.A large correlation (.82) between overall performance on the NeuroScreen and traditional batteries was observed. Small-to-large correlations were found between conceptually similar NeuroScreen and traditional tests of processing speed, working memory, motor speed, and executive functioning. Mean test performance differences between AYA with PHIV and controls were similar between test batteries. Both sets of tests identified similar rates of impaired participants. Conclusions: Results provide support for the acceptability and construct validity of the Thai NeuroScreen tests to assess neurocognition in Thai AYA with PHIV. An easy-to-use tool to assess neurocognition can help Thai providers provide better care for AYA with PHIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-708
Number of pages14
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2022

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Computerized neurocognitive tests
  • Perinatal hiv infection
  • Psychometric validity
  • Thailand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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