Adaptation of a proactive smoking cessation intervention to increase tobacco quitline use by LGBT smokers

Alicia K. Matthews*, Elizabeth Breen, Anna Veluz-Wilkins, Christina Ciecierski, Melissa A Simon, Diane Burrell, Brian L Hitsman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The study purpose was to evaluate the content of a proactive population health management intervention aimed at promoting uptake of smoking cessation treatments offered by the Illinois Tobacco Quitline (ITQL) among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-identified smokers. Methods: This study represents a partnership between a community-based health center and university researchers. As part of the study, focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with LGBT smokers (N = 30). First, we conducted focus groups to obtain feedback on the readability, acceptability, and motivational salience of a targeted and nontargeteed proactive outreach letter. After revisions, a series of in-depth interviews were conducted to evaluate finalized materials. Focus groups and interviews were systematically analyzed. Results: Based on feedback, the revised intervention letter was rated more positively than the initial version, with 80% of participants indicating that they found the information in the letter to be useful. Further, more participants reported that the letter would motivate them to accept a call from a quitline counselor compared with the initial version (47.6% vs. 60.0%, respectively). In the final iteration, 60% of participants preferred the targeted letter, 30% preferred the nontargeted letter, and 10% had no preference. In the first iteration, outreach text messages were rated as unacceptable or completely unacceptable by 54% of participants. The revised text messages and protocols were seen as unacceptable by only 10% of participants. Conclusions: The development and testing of population-based and cost-effective interventions is critical to the reduction of LGBT smoking disparities. The study protocol and intervention materials were well-received by participants. In a future study, we will evaluate the efficacy of the intervention in increasing use of the quitline among LGBT smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-84
Number of pages14
JournalProgress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
Volume13
Issue numberSpecial Issue 2019
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Transgender Persons
Tobacco Use
Smoking Cessation
nicotine
smoking
interview
Focus Groups
Text Messaging
Group
Interviews
counselor
health promotion
Sexual Minorities
Community Health Centers
Withholding Treatment
university
costs
health
Population
Tobacco

Keywords

  • Culturally targeted
  • LGBT
  • Proactive
  • Quitlines
  • Smoking cessation interventions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Matthews, Alicia K. ; Breen, Elizabeth ; Veluz-Wilkins, Anna ; Ciecierski, Christina ; Simon, Melissa A ; Burrell, Diane ; Hitsman, Brian L. / Adaptation of a proactive smoking cessation intervention to increase tobacco quitline use by LGBT smokers. In: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action. 2019 ; Vol. 13, No. Special Issue 2019. pp. 71-84.
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abstract = "Purpose: The study purpose was to evaluate the content of a proactive population health management intervention aimed at promoting uptake of smoking cessation treatments offered by the Illinois Tobacco Quitline (ITQL) among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-identified smokers. Methods: This study represents a partnership between a community-based health center and university researchers. As part of the study, focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with LGBT smokers (N = 30). First, we conducted focus groups to obtain feedback on the readability, acceptability, and motivational salience of a targeted and nontargeteed proactive outreach letter. After revisions, a series of in-depth interviews were conducted to evaluate finalized materials. Focus groups and interviews were systematically analyzed. Results: Based on feedback, the revised intervention letter was rated more positively than the initial version, with 80{\%} of participants indicating that they found the information in the letter to be useful. Further, more participants reported that the letter would motivate them to accept a call from a quitline counselor compared with the initial version (47.6{\%} vs. 60.0{\%}, respectively). In the final iteration, 60{\%} of participants preferred the targeted letter, 30{\%} preferred the nontargeted letter, and 10{\%} had no preference. In the first iteration, outreach text messages were rated as unacceptable or completely unacceptable by 54{\%} of participants. The revised text messages and protocols were seen as unacceptable by only 10{\%} of participants. Conclusions: The development and testing of population-based and cost-effective interventions is critical to the reduction of LGBT smoking disparities. The study protocol and intervention materials were well-received by participants. In a future study, we will evaluate the efficacy of the intervention in increasing use of the quitline among LGBT smokers.",
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Adaptation of a proactive smoking cessation intervention to increase tobacco quitline use by LGBT smokers. / Matthews, Alicia K.; Breen, Elizabeth; Veluz-Wilkins, Anna; Ciecierski, Christina; Simon, Melissa A; Burrell, Diane; Hitsman, Brian L.

In: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, Vol. 13, No. Special Issue 2019, 01.01.2019, p. 71-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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