Adaptive multiscale homogenization of the lattice discrete particle model for the analysis of damage and fracture in concrete

Roozbeh Rezakhani, Xinwei Zhou, Gianluca Cusatis*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents a new adaptive multiscale homogenization scheme for the simulation of damage and fracture in concrete structures. A two-scale homogenization method, coupling meso-scale discrete particle models to macro-scale finite element models, is formulated into an adaptive framework. A continuum multiaxial failure criterion for concrete is calibrated on the basis of fine-scale simulations, and it serves as the adaptive criterion in the multiscale framework. Thus, in this approach, simulations start without assigning any material Representative Volume Element (RVE) to the macro-scale finite elements. The finite elements that meet the adaptive criterion and must be entered into the multiscale homogenization framework are detected on the fly. This leads to a substantial reduction of the computational cost especially for loading conditions leading to damage localization in which only a small portion of the FE mesh is enriched with the homogenized RVE. Several numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the capability of the developed adaptive homogenization method. In addition, a detailed study on the computational cost is performed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-67
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Solids and Structures
Volume125
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2017

Keywords

  • Adaptive criteria
  • Adaptive multiscale homogenization
  • Concrete damage and fracture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Applied Mathematics

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