Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: An analysis of 77 cases

Michelle D. Reid, Olca Basturk, Walid L. Shaib, Yue Xue, Serdar Balci, Hye Jeong Choi, Gizem Akkas, Bahar Memis, Brian S. Robinson, Bassel F. El-Rayes, Charles A. Staley, Christopher A. Staley, Joshua H. Winer, Maria C. Russell, Jessica H. Knight, Michael Goodman, Alyssa M. Krasinskas, Volkan Adsay*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids ('adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids') are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29-84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n=3) and lung (n=1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed 'other' carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular ('carcinoid pattern') was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, 'adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid' is an appendix-specific, high-grade malignant neoplasm with distinctive morphology that is recognizable at metastatic sites and recapitulates crypt cells (appendiceal crypt cell adenocarcinoma). Unlike intestinal-type adenocarcinoma, it occurs predominantly in women, is disguised as gynecologic malignancy, and spreads along peritoneal surfaces with only rare hematogenous metastasis. It appears to be significantly more aggressive than appendiceal mucinous neoplasms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1243-1253
Number of pages11
JournalModern Pathology
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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