Adherence to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Gonococcal Treatment Guidelines among Chicago Health Care Providers, 2011-2012

Irina L. Tabidze, Tracy F. Nicholson, Tarek Mikati, Nanette Benbow, Supriya D. Mehta*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Expansion of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires rapid adaptation of treatment guidelines and responsive provider practice. We evaluated patient factors associated with provider adherence to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gonococcal treatment recommendations among Chicago providers in 2011 to 2012. Methods: Laboratory-confirmed cases of uncomplicated urogenital gonorrhea were classified via surveillance data as originating from Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) or non-CDPH providers. Recommended treatment was determined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sexually transmitted disease treatment guidelines: April 2011-July 2012 (period 1) andAugust-December 2012 (period 2, after August 2012 revision).Multivariable log-binomial regression identified factors associated with recommended treatment over time, stratified by provider type. Results: April 2011 through December 2012, 16,646 laboratoryconfirmed gonorrhea cases were identified, of which 9597 (57.7%) had treatment information: 2169 CDPH cases and 7428 non-CDPH cases. Documented recommended treatment increased for CDPH (period 1: 71.3%, period 2: 80.8%; P < 0.01) and non-CDPH providers (period 1: 63.5%, period 2: 68.9%; P < 0.01). Among CDPH cases, statistically significant factors associated with recommended treatment were male sex (adjusted prevalence rate ratio [aPRR], 1.16) white versus black race (aPRR, 0.68), same-day treatment (aPRR, 1.07), and period 2 (aPRR, 1.11). Among non-CDPH cases, statistically significant factors were as follows: male sex (aPRR, 1.10), other versus black race (aPRR, 0.91), same-day treatment (aPRR, 1.31), greater number of within-facility reported cases (aPRRs ranging from 1.22 to 1.41), and at least 50% withinfacility missing treatment data (aPRR, 0.84). Conclusions: Recommended treatment improved over time, yet remains suboptimal. Efforts to reduce variability and improve provider adherence to recommended treatment are urgently needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)422-428
Number of pages7
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 25 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adherence to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Gonococcal Treatment Guidelines among Chicago Health Care Providers, 2011-2012'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this