Adipocytic Progenitor Cells Give Rise to Pathogenic Myofibroblasts: Adipocyte-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Its Emerging Role in Fibrosis in Multiple Organs

Roberta Goncalves Marangoni*, Benjamin Korman, John Varga

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose of Review: Adipocytes have recently been shown to be able to reprogram to a myofibroblastic phenotype in a process termed adipocyte mesenchymal transition (AMT). This review seeks to discuss the relevance of this process to disease and explore its mechanisms. Recent Findings: AMT occurs in multiple organs and diseases, transdifferentiation goes through a precursor cell and there is a reversible process that can be influenced by metabolic stress, myeloid cells, immune dysregulation, and pharmacological intervention. Summary: AMT is a newly appreciated and highly relevant process in multiple forms of fibrosis. Targeting AMT may serve as a novel method of treating fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number79
JournalCurrent rheumatology reports
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

Keywords

  • Adipocyte
  • Adipose mesenchymal transition
  • Fibroblast
  • Fibrosis
  • Myofibroblast
  • Scleroderma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

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