Adolescents' technology and face-to-face time use predict objective sleep outcomes

Royette Tavernier*, Jennifer A. Heissel, Michael R. Sladek, Kathryn E. Grant, Emma K. Adam

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives The present study examined both within- and between-person associations between adolescents' time use (technology-based activities and face-to-face interactions with friends and family) and sleep behaviors. We also assessed whether age moderated associations between adolescents' time use with friends and family and sleep. Design Adolescents wore an actigraph monitor and completed brief evening surveys daily for 3 consecutive days. Participants Adolescents (N = 71; mean age = 14.50 years old, SD = 1.84; 43.7% female) were recruited from 3 public high schools in the Midwest. Measures We assessed 8 technology-based activities (eg, texting, working on a computer), as well as time spent engaged in face-to-face interactions with friends and family, via questions on adolescents' evening surveys. Actigraph monitors assessed 3 sleep behaviors: sleep latency, sleep hours, and sleep efficiency. Results Hierarchical linear models indicated that texting and working on the computer were associated with shorter sleep, whereas time spent talking on the phone predicted longer sleep. Time spent with friends predicted shorter sleep latencies, while family time predicted longer sleep latencies. Age moderated the association between time spent with friends and sleep efficiency, as well as between family time and sleep efficiency. Specifically, longer time spent interacting with friends was associated with higher sleep efficiency but only among younger adolescents. Furthermore, longer family time was associated with higher sleep efficiency but only for older adolescents. Conclusion Findings are discussed in terms of the importance of regulating adolescents' technology use and improving opportunities for face-to-face interactions with friends, particularly for younger adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-283
Number of pages8
JournalSleep Health
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Adolescent sleep
  • Family relationships
  • Peer relationships
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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