Adoptive immunotherapy for leukemia: donor lymphocytes transduced with the herpes simplex thymidine kinase gene.

C. J. Link, A. Traynor, T. Seregina, R. K. Burt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The overall goal of adoptive immunotherapy with genetically modified lymphocytes is to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The initial data reviewed here suggest that the behavior of the allogeneic HStk transgenic cells can be modified after administration to patients. Further study is needed to identify the response rates and risks associated with this procedure. In particular, larger studies will be needed with appropriate randomization to determine if the response rate to genetically modified cells is equivalent to the response rates with unmodified cells. Wider application of these techniques in the initial setting of allogeneic transplantation will undoubtedly occur and such trials have been initiated at several institutions. Careful attention to vector, suicide gene, selectable marker, efficiency of transduction, and cell dose will be necessary when comparing different trials since these variables will probably affect transgenic cell survival and response rates. [figure: see text]

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-375
Number of pages7
JournalCancer treatment and research
Volume101
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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