Adult-Onset Atopic Dermatitis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

One in 4 adults with atopic dermatitis (AD) report adult-onset disease. Adult-onset AD appears to be associated with a different disease phenotype compared with childhood-onset AD. A broad differential diagnosis must be considered in a patient presenting with an adult-onset eczematous eruption, including allergic contact dermatitis, mycosis fungoides/cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, psoriasis, scabies, and so forth. This review will specifically address the diagnosis, workup, and management of adult-onset AD. In adults presenting a new-onset chronic eczematous eruption, consideration should be given to a diagnosis of adult-onset AD. Patch testing should be performed to rule out allergic contact dermatitis. A biopsy may be obtained to exclude alternative diagnoses, including cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and psoriasis.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages28-33
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Atopic Dermatitis
Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Psoriasis
Scabies
Mycosis Fungoides
Differential Diagnosis
Phenotype
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Adult onset
  • Asthma
  • Atopic dermatitis
  • Eczema
  • Hay fever
  • Recurrent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

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Adult-Onset Atopic Dermatitis. / Silverberg, Jonathan I.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 28-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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