Advances in architectures and tools for FPGAs and their impact on the design of complex systems for particle physics

Anthony Gregerson, Amin Farmahini-Farahani, William Plishker, Zaipeng Xie, Katherine Compton, Shuvra Bhattacharyya, Michael Schulte

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The continual improvement of semiconductor technology has provided rapid advancements in device frequency and density. Designers of electronics systems for high-energy physics (HEP) have benefited from these advancements, transitioning many designs from fixed-function ASICs to more flexible FPGA-based platforms. Today's FPGA devices provide a significantly higher amount of resources than those available during the initial Large Hadron Collider design phase. To take advantage of the capabilities of future FPGAs in the next generation of HEP experiments, designers must not only anticipate further improvements in FPGA hardware, but must also adopt design tools and methodologies that can scale along with that hardware. In this paper, we outline the major trends in FPGA hardware, describe the design challenges these trends will present to developers of HEP electronics, and discuss a range of techniques that can be adopted to overcome these challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics, TWEPP 2009
Pages617-626
Number of pages10
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
EventTopical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics, TWEPP 2009 - Paris, France
Duration: Sep 21 2009Sep 25 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics, TWEPP 2009

Conference

ConferenceTopical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics, TWEPP 2009
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period9/21/099/25/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics

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