Advances in stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and engineered cells

Delivery vehicles for anti-glioma therapy

Jacob S. Young, Ramin A. Morshed, Julius W. Kim, Irina V. Balyasnikova, Atique U. Ahmed, MacIej S. Lesniak*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: A limitation of small molecule inhibitors, nanoparticles (NPs) and therapeutic adenoviruses is their incomplete distribution within the entirety of solid tumors such as malignant gliomas. Currently, cell-based carriers are making their way into the clinical setting as they offer the potential to selectively deliver many types of therapies to cancer cells.Areas covered: Here, we review the properties of stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and engineered cells that possess the tumor-tropic behavior necessary to serve as cell carriers. We also report on the different types of therapeutic agents that have been delivered to tumors by these cell carriers, including: i) therapeutic genes; ii) oncolytic viruses; iii) NPs; and iv) antibodies. The current challenges and future promises of cell-based drug delivery are also discussed.Expert opinion: While the emergence of stem cell-mediated therapy has resulted in promising preclinical results and a human clinical trial utilizing this approach is currently underway, there is still a need to optimize these delivery platforms. By improving the loading of therapeutic agents into stem cells and enhancing their migratory ability and persistence, significant improvements in targeted cancer therapy may be achieved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1733-1746
Number of pages14
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Delivery
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Glioma
Stem Cells
Neoplasms
Nanoparticles
Therapeutics
Oncolytic Viruses
Aptitude
Expert Testimony
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Adenoviridae
Clinical Trials
Antibodies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Genes

Keywords

  • Cell carriers
  • Cell-delivered cancer therapy
  • Engineered cells
  • Gene therapy
  • Glioma
  • Immunotherapy
  • Induced pluripotent stem cells
  • Nanoparticles
  • Oncolytic virotherapy
  • Stem cells
  • Targeted drug delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

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title = "Advances in stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and engineered cells: Delivery vehicles for anti-glioma therapy",
abstract = "Introduction: A limitation of small molecule inhibitors, nanoparticles (NPs) and therapeutic adenoviruses is their incomplete distribution within the entirety of solid tumors such as malignant gliomas. Currently, cell-based carriers are making their way into the clinical setting as they offer the potential to selectively deliver many types of therapies to cancer cells.Areas covered: Here, we review the properties of stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and engineered cells that possess the tumor-tropic behavior necessary to serve as cell carriers. We also report on the different types of therapeutic agents that have been delivered to tumors by these cell carriers, including: i) therapeutic genes; ii) oncolytic viruses; iii) NPs; and iv) antibodies. The current challenges and future promises of cell-based drug delivery are also discussed.Expert opinion: While the emergence of stem cell-mediated therapy has resulted in promising preclinical results and a human clinical trial utilizing this approach is currently underway, there is still a need to optimize these delivery platforms. By improving the loading of therapeutic agents into stem cells and enhancing their migratory ability and persistence, significant improvements in targeted cancer therapy may be achieved.",
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Advances in stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and engineered cells : Delivery vehicles for anti-glioma therapy. / Young, Jacob S.; Morshed, Ramin A.; Kim, Julius W.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Ahmed, Atique U.; Lesniak, MacIej S.

In: Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery, Vol. 11, No. 11, 01.01.2014, p. 1733-1746.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Advances in stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and engineered cells

T2 - Delivery vehicles for anti-glioma therapy

AU - Young, Jacob S.

AU - Morshed, Ramin A.

AU - Kim, Julius W.

AU - Balyasnikova, Irina V.

AU - Ahmed, Atique U.

AU - Lesniak, MacIej S.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Introduction: A limitation of small molecule inhibitors, nanoparticles (NPs) and therapeutic adenoviruses is their incomplete distribution within the entirety of solid tumors such as malignant gliomas. Currently, cell-based carriers are making their way into the clinical setting as they offer the potential to selectively deliver many types of therapies to cancer cells.Areas covered: Here, we review the properties of stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and engineered cells that possess the tumor-tropic behavior necessary to serve as cell carriers. We also report on the different types of therapeutic agents that have been delivered to tumors by these cell carriers, including: i) therapeutic genes; ii) oncolytic viruses; iii) NPs; and iv) antibodies. The current challenges and future promises of cell-based drug delivery are also discussed.Expert opinion: While the emergence of stem cell-mediated therapy has resulted in promising preclinical results and a human clinical trial utilizing this approach is currently underway, there is still a need to optimize these delivery platforms. By improving the loading of therapeutic agents into stem cells and enhancing their migratory ability and persistence, significant improvements in targeted cancer therapy may be achieved.

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KW - Stem cells

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