Adverse events reported to the Food and Drug Administration from 2004 to 2016 for cosmetics and personal care products marketed to newborns and infants

Erika Cornell, Michael Kwa, Amy S. Paller, Shuai Xu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Objectives: Despite their ubiquitous use and several recent health controversies involving cosmetics and personal care products for children, the Food and Drug Administration has little oversight of these products and relies on consumer-submitted adverse event reports. We assessed the recently released Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Adverse Event Reporting System database for adverse event reports submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for baby personal care products and to determine whether useful insights can be derived. Methods: We extracted the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Adverse Event Reporting System data file from 2004 to 2016 and examined the subset classified according to the Food and Drug Administration–designated product class as a baby product. Events were manually categorized into product type and symptom type to assess for trends. Results: Only 166 total adverse events were reported to the Food and Drug Administration for baby products from 2004 to 2016. The majority of reports indicated rash or other skin reaction; 46% of reported events led to a health care visit. Conclusion: Pediatric dermatologists should consider submitting cosmetics and personal care product adverse event reports and encouraging consumers to do so likewise in situations in which a product adversely affects a child's health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-229
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric dermatology
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2018

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Keywords

  • Food and Drug Administration
  • adverse events
  • allergic contact dermatitis
  • cosmetics
  • personal care products
  • regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dermatology

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