Affirming the Interdependent Self: Implications for Latino Student Performance

Rebecca Covarrubias*, Sarah D. Herrmann, Stephanie A. Fryberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined whether culture-relevant affirmations that focus on family (i.e., family affirmation) would enhance performance for Latino students compared to affirmations that focus on the individual (i.e., self-affirmation). In Study 1 (N = 82), Latino middle school students exposed to a family affirmation outperformed Latino students exposed to a self-affirmation. In Study 2 (N = 269), Latino college students exposed to a family affirmation outperformed Latino students exposed to a self-affirmation and outperformed European American students across conditions. European American students performed equally well across conditions. The findings suggest that culture provides a meaningful framework for developing effective classroom strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-57
Number of pages11
JournalBasic and Applied Social Psychology
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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