Affordances of digital, textile and living media for designing and learning biology in k-12 education

Yasmin B. Kafai, Michael Horn, Joshua Danish, Megan Humburg, Xintian Tu, Bria Davis, Chris Georgen, Noel Enyedy, Engin Bumbacher, Paulo Blikstein, Peter Washington, Ingmar Riedel-Kruse, Tamara Clegg, Virginia Byrne, Leyla Norooz, Seokbin Kang, Jon Froehlich, Justice T. Walker, Debora Lui, Emma AndersonYasmin B. Kafai

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

In this symposium we are examining the affordances that particular materials hold for supporting learning biology inside and outside of school along three dimensions: (1) digital materials that encompass screens and software through which students can interact, (2) textile materials that allow students to wear bodysuits that can help them visualize physical movements on interactive displays, and (3) interactive materials that allow students to interact with living microorganisms through games in science museums or through computational models that students design and test against the real data in science classrooms. Panelists will discuss how affordances of tinkerability (messing around), perceptibility (seeing results), expressivity (customizing experiences), and usability (using outcomes) entered into their considerations when designing and studying of environments, games, and design activities for interacting and learning with biology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1275-1282
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS
Volume2
Issue number2018-June
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2018: Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count - London, United Kingdom
Duration: Jun 23 2018Jun 27 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

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