African-American patients' preferences for a health center campaign promoting HIV testing: An exploratory study and future directions

Monisha Arya*, Michael A. Kallen, Richard L. Street, Kasisomayajula Viswanath, Thomas P. Giordano

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: In 2006, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended routine HIV testing in health care settings and called for HIV testing campaigns targeting African Americans. In a 2011 national survey, 63% of African Americans wanted information on HIV testing.

Methods: In our study, 176 African Americans were surveyed to determine channels and spokespersons for an HIV testing campaign.

Results: Among 9 media channels, the top 3 ranked as "very likely" to convince them to get HIV tested were television, poster, and brochure. Among 10 spokespersons, the top 3 were doctor, nurse, and "real person like me."

Conclusion: The media are a cost-effective strategy to promote HIV prevention. Posters and brochures are inexpensive and easy to reproduce for clinical settings. Television campaigns may be feasible in clinics with closed-circuit televisions. Research is needed on campaign messages. An effective health center HIV testing campaign may help mitigate the disproportionate toll HIV is having on African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)488-491
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 24 2014

Keywords

  • African American
  • HIV testing
  • media campaigns

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'African-American patients' preferences for a health center campaign promoting HIV testing: An exploratory study and future directions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this