Age variation in the association between angiographic coronary disease and angina from the Coronary Artery Surgery Study (CASS)

Lloyd D. Fisher*, Charles Maynard, Alfred W. Rademaker, Edwin L. Alderman, Michael Mock

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Between July 1974 and May 1979, 19,153 non-randomized patients without prior cardiac surgery and with chest pain were studied angiographically and enrolled in the Coronary Artery Surgery Study (CASS). The primary question addressed by this paper is: for fixed levels of coronary artery disease, are the presence and severity of angina pectoris greater for older than for younger patients? For those with the same extent of disease, older patients were more likely to have angina and to exhibit more severe symptoms. After adjustment for covariates using logistic regression analysis, age was found to be an important, independent predictor of the presence and severity of angina. There are many possible explanations for these findings, although physiologic factors related to aging, the disease process, and deconditioning associated with an increased sedentary life style seem most reasonable. Another possibility has to do with referral patterns for study and the prevalence of angina in the different age groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-326
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1989

Keywords

  • Angina pectoris
  • Coronary artery disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Age variation in the association between angiographic coronary disease and angina from the Coronary Artery Surgery Study (CASS)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this