Air-stable ternary organic solar cells achieved by using fullerene additives in non-fullerene acceptor-polymer donor blends

Elisa Trippodo, Vincenzo Campisciano, Liang Wen Feng, Yao Chen*, Wei Huang, Joaquin M. Alzola, Ding Zheng, Vinod K. Sangwan*, Mark C. Hersam*, Michael R. Wasielewski*, Bruno Pignataro*, Francesco Giacalone*, Tobin J. Marks*, Antonio Facchetti*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Organic solar cells (OSCs) based on donor-acceptor blends have shown a rapid improvement in power conversion efficiency (PCE) now approaching, for small cells, those of the state-of-the art commercial solar modules. However, performance degradation remains one of the most critical impediments for OSC technology commercialization. Ternary solar cells where a third component, for instance an acceptor, is added to a non-fullerene acceptor-polymer donor blend are an effective approach for improving both OSC efficiency and long-term stability. Here, we study the role of two fullerene acceptors, ET18 and PCBM, as the third component in PD:Y6 blends. These fullerene derivatives significantly enhance the cell stability, which retained >90% of their initial PCEs (13-14%) even after storage in air for 6 months, compared to only ∼20% retention for the binary devices. GIWAXS, AFM, in situ impedance spectroscopy and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy measurements reveal that the enhanced stability of the ternary devices results from a more robust blend morphology reducing charge recombination in the ternary devices during aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8074-8083
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Materials Chemistry C
Volume11
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

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