Alcohol consumption and 17-year mortality in the Chicago Western Electric Company study

Alan R. Dyer*, Jeremiah Stamler, Oglesby Paul, Mark Lepper, Richard B. Shekelle, Harlley McKean, Dan Garside

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

129 Scopus citations

Abstract

The association between baseline alcohol intake and mortality from all causes and specific causes based on 17 years of follow-up experience was analyzed for 1,832 white males originally age 40-55 from the Chicago Western Electric Company study. Alcohol consumption was expressed as number of drinks per day for all intake combined, including hard liquor, beer, and wine, based on the maximum intake reported on three questionnaires. With mortality rates adjusted only for age, total intake was associated with increased risk of death from all causes, the cardiovascular diseases, coronary heart disease, cancer, and other causes at the level of six or more drinks per day. There was no increase in mortality with increasing alcohol consumption below this level. Only the associations between alcohol intake and death from the cardiovascular diseases and coronary heart disease failed to persist after adjustment for other risk factors, such as smoking and blood pressure. When the deaths were divided into those occurring within the first 10 years of follow-up and those occurring more than 10 years after entry, the association between baseline alcohol intake and mortality was generally stronger for those deaths occurring more than 10 years after entry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-90
Number of pages13
JournalPreventive medicine
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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