Alterations in resting state oscillations and connectivity in sensory and motor networks in women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

Lisa A. Kilpatrick, Jason J. Kutch, Kirsten Tillisch, Bruce D. Naliboff, Jennifer S. Labus, Zhiguo Jiang, Melissa A. Farmer, A. Vania Apkarian, Sean Mackey, Katherine T. Martucci, Daniel J. Clauw, Richard E. Harris, Georg Deutsch, Timothy J. Ness, Claire C. Yang, Kenneth Maravilla, Chris Mullins, Emeran A. Mayer*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose The pathophysiology of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome remains incompletely understood but is thought to involve central disturbance in the processing of pain and viscerosensory signals. We identified differences in brain activity and connectivity between female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and healthy controls to advance clinical phenotyping and treatment efforts for interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Materials and Methods We examined oscillation dynamics of intrinsic brain activity in a large sample of well phenotyped female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and female healthy controls. Data were collected during 10-minute resting functional magnetic resonance imaging as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain Research Network project. The blood oxygen level dependent signal was transformed to the frequency domain. Relative power was calculated for multiple frequency bands. Results Results demonstrated altered frequency distributions in viscerosensory (post insula), somatosensory (postcentral gyrus) and motor regions (anterior paracentral lobule, and medial and ventral supplementary motor areas) in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Also, the anterior paracentral lobule, and medial and ventral supplementary motor areas showed increased functional connectivity to the midbrain (red nucleus) and cerebellum. This increased functional connectivity was greatest in patients who reported pain during bladder filling. Conclusions Findings suggest that women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome have a sensorimotor component to the pathological condition involving an alteration in intrinsic oscillations and connectivity in a cortico-cerebellar network previously associated with bladder function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)947-955
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume192
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014

Keywords

  • brain mapping
  • cystitis
  • interstitial
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • pain
  • urinary bladder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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    Kilpatrick, L. A., Kutch, J. J., Tillisch, K., Naliboff, B. D., Labus, J. S., Jiang, Z., Farmer, M. A., Apkarian, A. V., Mackey, S., Martucci, K. T., Clauw, D. J., Harris, R. E., Deutsch, G., Ness, T. J., Yang, C. C., Maravilla, K., Mullins, C., & Mayer, E. A. (2014). Alterations in resting state oscillations and connectivity in sensory and motor networks in women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Journal of Urology, 192(3), 947-955. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2014.03.093