Ambiguity in social categorization: The role of prejudice and facial affect in race categorization

Kurt Hugenberg*, Galen V. Bodenhausen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

252 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two studies tested the hypothesis that perceivers' prejudice and targets' facial expressions bias race categorization in Stereotypic directions. Specifically, we hypothesized that racial prejudice would be more strongly associated with a tendency to categorize hostile (but not happy) racially ambiguous faces as African American. We obtained support for this hypothesis using both a speeded dichotomous categorization task (Studies 1 and 2) and a rating-scale task (Study 2). Implicit prejudice (but not explicit prejudice) was related to increased sensitivity to the targets' facial expressions, regardless of whether prejudice was measured after (Study 1) or before (Study 2) the race categorizations were made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-345
Number of pages4
JournalPsychological Science
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ambiguity in social categorization: The role of prejudice and facial affect in race categorization'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this