Amphotericin B deoxycholate nasal spray administered to hematopoietic stem cell recipients with prior fungal colonization of the upper airway passages is associated with low rates of invasive fungal infection

S. M. Trifilio*, R. Heraty, A. Zomas, Z. Zhou, J. L. Fong, D. Liu, C. Zhao, J. Zhang, Jayesh Mehta

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Invasive fungal infections cause major problems during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fungal colonization of the upper airway passages occurs frequently, and may serve as a portal of entry for potentially life-threatening fungal infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Methods: A clinical practice was instituted at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago in 2005, to administer amphotericin B deoxycholate nasal spray (ABNS) 0.5% to all HSCT recipients with fungal colonization of their nasal passages, in addition to standard oral antifungal prophylaxis. Results: Among 1945 HSCT patients treated during the study period, 109 patients were identified with positive fungal surveillance cultures. Conclusion: Breakthrough fungal infections occurred in only 2 patients (2%), thus in this select group of HSCT recipients, ABNS administration is associated with a very low rate of breakthrough infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalTransplant Infectious Disease
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Keywords

  • Amphotericin B
  • Antifungal nasal spray
  • Colonization
  • Fungal infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Infectious Diseases

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