An alternative approach to the surgical management of physiologically corrected transposition with ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis or atresia

M. N. Ilbawi*, S. Y. DeLeon, C. L. Backer, C. E. Duffy, A. J. Muster, V. R. Zales, M. H. Paul, F. S. Idriss

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

136 Scopus citations

Abstract

A modified approach to the surgical management of corrected transposition of the great vessels with ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis or atresia was used successfully in two patients. The procedure consisted of performing a venous switch operation, directing the blood flow from the morphologically left ventricle (right-sided chamber) into the aorta through the ventricular septal defect and inserting a valved conduit between the left-sided morphologically right ventricle and the pulmonary artery. This approach has several advantages when compared with the traditional surgical management, which consists of closure of the ventricular septal defect and a left ventricular (right-sided chamber) to pulmonary artery conduit. It uses the morphologically left ventricle as the systemic pumping chamber, thereby minimizing long-term ventricular failure. It allows closure of the defect from the right ventricular side of the septum, thus decreasing the prevalence of complete atrioventricular block. It also avoids use of the tricuspid valve as the systemic atrioventricular valve and therefore decreases the chance of postoperative valve regurgitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)410-415
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume100
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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