An ancient chinese bronze fragment re-examined after 50 years: Contributions from modern and traditional techniques

M. L. Young, F. Casadio*, J. Marvin, W. T. Chase, D. C. Dunand

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Modern analytical techniques, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy, alongside scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and powder X-ray diffraction, were used to investigate bronze fragments from an ancient Chinese bronze vessel (also known as a hu) in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. Previous compositional results obtained by R. J. Gettens in 1951, using traditional optical metallography and powder X-ray diffraction, were compared with the present analysis. The investigation provided a complete description of the composition of the ancient metal alloy and spatially resolved identification of the major and minor corrosion products. Furthermore, the study also provided the opportunity for a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of the various instrumental techniques available to the analyst for the study of ancient bronzes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1015-1043
Number of pages29
JournalArchaeometry
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Keywords

  • Archaeometallurgy
  • Chinese Bronzes
  • Icp-Oes
  • Raman Microscopy
  • Sims
  • Synchrotron Radiation (Sr)-Xrd

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Archaeology

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