An economic evaluation of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation as an alternative to autologous bone marrow transplantation in multiple myeloma

N. Duncan*, M. Hewetson, R. Powles, N. Raje, J. Mehta

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) is increasingly being utilised as an alternative to autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) in the treatment of malignant diseases. We have performed a pharmacoeconomic study using cost-minimisation analysis to evaluate the two techniques in a population of multiple myeloma patients undergoing PBSCT (n = 37) or ABMT (n = 14). In the PBSCT group, the time to > 0.5 x 109/l neutrophils was significantly shorter (16 vs 22 days; P = 0.0019) as was the time to > 50 x 109/l platelets (19 vs 27 days; P = 0.0019). The faster haematopoietic recovery resulted in a reduced period of intravenous antibiotic therapy (12 vs 19 days; P < 0.0001), reduced requirements for platelet transfusions (12 vs 31.5 units; P = 0.0005), and ultimately, a significant reduction in duration of hospitalisation (19 vs 27.5 days; P < 0.0001). These clinical benefits translated into economic benefits such that the total cost in the PBSCT group was 27.5% less than in the ABMT group (< £7995 vs < £11 026; P = 0.0001). We conclude that the use of PBSCT as an alternative to ABMT in patients with multiple myeloma is associated with demonstrable economic advantages in addition to clinical benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1175-1178
Number of pages4
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1996

Keywords

  • Autologous bone marrow transplantation
  • Economic aspects
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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