An examination of the implementation of a patient navigation program to improve breast and cervical cancer screening rates of Chinese immigrant women: a qualitative study

Marquita W. Lewis-Thames, Laura S. Tom, Ivy S. Leung, Anna Yang, Melissa A. Simon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Chinese Americans have lower breast and cervical cancer screening rates than the national average and experience multiple barriers to cancer care. Patient navigators have improved screening and follow-up rates for medically underserved populations, yet investigations of cancer navigation programs and their implementation among Chinese Americans are limited. To address this gap, we used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to examine facilitators and barriers to implementing the Chicago-based Chinatown Patient Navigation Program (CPNP) for breast and cervical cancer screening, follow-up, and treatment. Methods: Stakeholders from clinical care, supportive care services, and community organizations were invited to participate in qualitative interviews to illuminate implementation processes and stakeholder perspectives of facilitators and barriers to implementing the CPNP. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and deductively coded according to CFIR domains, including (1) intervention characteristics; (2) outer setting; (3) inner setting; and (4) the implementation process. Results: We interviewed a convenience sample of 16 stakeholders representing a range of roles in cancer care, including nurses, clinical team members, administrators, physicians, a community-based organization leader, and a CPNP navigator. Findings detail several facilitators to implementing the CPNP, including patient navigators that prepared Chinese-speaking patients for their clinic visits, interpretation services, highly accessible patient navigators, and high-quality flexible services. Barriers to program implementation included limited regular feedback provided to stakeholders regarding their program involvement. Also, early in the program’s implementation there was limited awareness of the CPNP navigators’ roles and responsibilities, insufficient office space for the navigators, and few Chinese language patient resource materials. Conclusions: These findings provide valuable information on implementation of future patient navigation programs serving Chinese American and other limited-English speaking immigrant populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number28
JournalBMC Women's Health
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Chinese American
  • Health education
  • Immigrant populations
  • Minority health
  • Patient navigation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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