An experimental analysis of acquisition, generalisation, and maintenance of naming behaviour in a patient with anomia

Cynthia K Thompson*, Kevin P. Kearns, Lisa A. Edmonds

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of a cueing hierarchy on naming in a patient with anomic aphasia. Using a single-subject multiple baseline design across behaviors, the patient was trained to produce single inanimate nouns while generalization was tested to semantically related nouns matched for frequency of occurrence. Results showed successful acquisition and maintenance of trained words, but no generalization to untrained words. These data indicate that generalization does not occur as a natural by-product of successful treatment and suggest, as pointed out by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968), that "generalization should be programmed rather than expected or lamented".

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1226-1244
Number of pages19
JournalAphasiology
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Fingerprint

Anomia
speech disorder
Maintenance
Biological Products
Naming
Experimental Analysis
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

@article{f6e369ba67164403bcf4ad97ad615692,
title = "An experimental analysis of acquisition, generalisation, and maintenance of naming behaviour in a patient with anomia",
abstract = "This paper examines the effects of a cueing hierarchy on naming in a patient with anomic aphasia. Using a single-subject multiple baseline design across behaviors, the patient was trained to produce single inanimate nouns while generalization was tested to semantically related nouns matched for frequency of occurrence. Results showed successful acquisition and maintenance of trained words, but no generalization to untrained words. These data indicate that generalization does not occur as a natural by-product of successful treatment and suggest, as pointed out by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968), that {"}generalization should be programmed rather than expected or lamented{"}.",
author = "Thompson, {Cynthia K} and Kearns, {Kevin P.} and Edmonds, {Lisa A.}",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/02687030600875655",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "1226--1244",
journal = "Aphasiology",
issn = "0268-7038",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "12",

}

An experimental analysis of acquisition, generalisation, and maintenance of naming behaviour in a patient with anomia. / Thompson, Cynthia K; Kearns, Kevin P.; Edmonds, Lisa A.

In: Aphasiology, Vol. 20, No. 12, 01.12.2006, p. 1226-1244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - An experimental analysis of acquisition, generalisation, and maintenance of naming behaviour in a patient with anomia

AU - Thompson, Cynthia K

AU - Kearns, Kevin P.

AU - Edmonds, Lisa A.

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - This paper examines the effects of a cueing hierarchy on naming in a patient with anomic aphasia. Using a single-subject multiple baseline design across behaviors, the patient was trained to produce single inanimate nouns while generalization was tested to semantically related nouns matched for frequency of occurrence. Results showed successful acquisition and maintenance of trained words, but no generalization to untrained words. These data indicate that generalization does not occur as a natural by-product of successful treatment and suggest, as pointed out by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968), that "generalization should be programmed rather than expected or lamented".

AB - This paper examines the effects of a cueing hierarchy on naming in a patient with anomic aphasia. Using a single-subject multiple baseline design across behaviors, the patient was trained to produce single inanimate nouns while generalization was tested to semantically related nouns matched for frequency of occurrence. Results showed successful acquisition and maintenance of trained words, but no generalization to untrained words. These data indicate that generalization does not occur as a natural by-product of successful treatment and suggest, as pointed out by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968), that "generalization should be programmed rather than expected or lamented".

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33749187095&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33749187095&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02687030600875655

DO - 10.1080/02687030600875655

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 1226

EP - 1244

JO - Aphasiology

JF - Aphasiology

SN - 0268-7038

IS - 12

ER -