An exploratory analysis of partner action and camera control in a video-mediated collaborative task

Abhishek Ranjan*, Jeremy P. Birnholtz, Ravin Balakrishnan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper reports on an exploratory experimental study of the relationships between physical movement and desired visual information in the performance of video-mediated collaborative tasks in the real world by geographically distributed groups. Twenty-three pairs of participants (one "helper" and one "worker") linked only by video and audio participated in a Lego construction task in one of three experimental conditions: a fixed scene camera, a helper-controlled pan-tilt-zoom camera, and a dedicated operator-controlled camera. "Worker" motion was tracked in 3-D space for all three conditions, as were all camera movements. Results suggest performance benefits for the operator-controlled condition, and the relationships between camera position/movement and worker action are explored to generate preliminary theoretical and design implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 20th Anniversary ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2006
Pages403-412
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event20th Anniversary ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2006 - Banff, AB, Canada
Duration: Nov 4 2006Nov 8 2006

Other

Other20th Anniversary ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW 2006
CountryCanada
CityBanff, AB
Period11/4/0611/8/06

Keywords

  • Camera control
  • Collaboration
  • Computer vision
  • Computer-supported cooperative work
  • Empirical studies
  • Motion tracking
  • Video conferencing
  • Video mediated communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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