An observational study identifying obese subgroups among older adults at increased risk of mobility disability

Do perceptions of the neighborhood environment matter?

and for the LIFE Study Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Obesity is an increasingly prevalent condition among older adults, yet relatively little is known about how built environment variables may be associated with obesity in older age groups. This is particularly the case for more vulnerable older adults already showing functional limitations associated with subsequent disability. Methods: The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) trial dataset (n = 1600) was used to explore the associations between perceived built environment variables and baseline obesity levels. Age-stratified recursive partitioning methods were applied to identify distinct subgroups with varying obesity prevalence. Results: Among participants aged 70-78 years, four distinct subgroups, defined by combinations of perceived environment and race-ethnicity variables, were identified. The subgroups with the lowest obesity prevalence (45.5-59.4 %) consisted of participants who reported living in neighborhoods with higher residential density. Among participants aged 79-89 years, the subgroup (of three distinct subgroups identified) with the lowest obesity prevalence (19.4 %) consisted of non-African American/Black participants who reported living in neighborhoods with friends or acquaintances similar in demographic characteristics to themselves. Overall support for the partitioned subgroupings was obtained using mixed model regression analysis. Conclusions: The results suggest that, in combination with race/ethnicity, features of the perceived neighborhood built and social environments differentiated distinct groups of vulnerable older adults from different age strata that differed in obesity prevalence. Pending further verification, the results may help to inform subsequent targeting of such subgroups for further investigation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier = NCT01072500

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number157
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 18 2015

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Observational Studies
Obesity
Social Environment
Life Style
Age Groups
Regression Analysis
Demography

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Disability
  • Homophily
  • Mobility
  • Neighborhood
  • Obesity
  • Perceived environment
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Recursive partitioning
  • Residential density

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{13484c8d69b74e7c937b9148d04a1e94,
title = "An observational study identifying obese subgroups among older adults at increased risk of mobility disability: Do perceptions of the neighborhood environment matter?",
abstract = "Background: Obesity is an increasingly prevalent condition among older adults, yet relatively little is known about how built environment variables may be associated with obesity in older age groups. This is particularly the case for more vulnerable older adults already showing functional limitations associated with subsequent disability. Methods: The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) trial dataset (n = 1600) was used to explore the associations between perceived built environment variables and baseline obesity levels. Age-stratified recursive partitioning methods were applied to identify distinct subgroups with varying obesity prevalence. Results: Among participants aged 70-78 years, four distinct subgroups, defined by combinations of perceived environment and race-ethnicity variables, were identified. The subgroups with the lowest obesity prevalence (45.5-59.4 {\%}) consisted of participants who reported living in neighborhoods with higher residential density. Among participants aged 79-89 years, the subgroup (of three distinct subgroups identified) with the lowest obesity prevalence (19.4 {\%}) consisted of non-African American/Black participants who reported living in neighborhoods with friends or acquaintances similar in demographic characteristics to themselves. Overall support for the partitioned subgroupings was obtained using mixed model regression analysis. Conclusions: The results suggest that, in combination with race/ethnicity, features of the perceived neighborhood built and social environments differentiated distinct groups of vulnerable older adults from different age strata that differed in obesity prevalence. Pending further verification, the results may help to inform subsequent targeting of such subgroups for further investigation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier = NCT01072500",
keywords = "Aging, Disability, Homophily, Mobility, Neighborhood, Obesity, Perceived environment, Race/ethnicity, Recursive partitioning, Residential density",
author = "{and for the LIFE Study Investigators} and King, {Abby C.} and Deborah Salvo and Banda, {Jorge A.} and Ahn, {David K.} and Gill, {Thomas M.} and Michael Miller and Newman, {Anne B.} and Fielding, {Roger A.} and Carlos Siordia and Spencer Moore and Sara Folta and Bonnie Spring and Todd Manini and Marco Pahor",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1186/s12966-015-0322-1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
journal = "International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - An observational study identifying obese subgroups among older adults at increased risk of mobility disability

T2 - Do perceptions of the neighborhood environment matter?

AU - and for the LIFE Study Investigators

AU - King, Abby C.

AU - Salvo, Deborah

AU - Banda, Jorge A.

AU - Ahn, David K.

AU - Gill, Thomas M.

AU - Miller, Michael

AU - Newman, Anne B.

AU - Fielding, Roger A.

AU - Siordia, Carlos

AU - Moore, Spencer

AU - Folta, Sara

AU - Spring, Bonnie

AU - Manini, Todd

AU - Pahor, Marco

PY - 2015/12/18

Y1 - 2015/12/18

N2 - Background: Obesity is an increasingly prevalent condition among older adults, yet relatively little is known about how built environment variables may be associated with obesity in older age groups. This is particularly the case for more vulnerable older adults already showing functional limitations associated with subsequent disability. Methods: The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) trial dataset (n = 1600) was used to explore the associations between perceived built environment variables and baseline obesity levels. Age-stratified recursive partitioning methods were applied to identify distinct subgroups with varying obesity prevalence. Results: Among participants aged 70-78 years, four distinct subgroups, defined by combinations of perceived environment and race-ethnicity variables, were identified. The subgroups with the lowest obesity prevalence (45.5-59.4 %) consisted of participants who reported living in neighborhoods with higher residential density. Among participants aged 79-89 years, the subgroup (of three distinct subgroups identified) with the lowest obesity prevalence (19.4 %) consisted of non-African American/Black participants who reported living in neighborhoods with friends or acquaintances similar in demographic characteristics to themselves. Overall support for the partitioned subgroupings was obtained using mixed model regression analysis. Conclusions: The results suggest that, in combination with race/ethnicity, features of the perceived neighborhood built and social environments differentiated distinct groups of vulnerable older adults from different age strata that differed in obesity prevalence. Pending further verification, the results may help to inform subsequent targeting of such subgroups for further investigation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier = NCT01072500

AB - Background: Obesity is an increasingly prevalent condition among older adults, yet relatively little is known about how built environment variables may be associated with obesity in older age groups. This is particularly the case for more vulnerable older adults already showing functional limitations associated with subsequent disability. Methods: The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) trial dataset (n = 1600) was used to explore the associations between perceived built environment variables and baseline obesity levels. Age-stratified recursive partitioning methods were applied to identify distinct subgroups with varying obesity prevalence. Results: Among participants aged 70-78 years, four distinct subgroups, defined by combinations of perceived environment and race-ethnicity variables, were identified. The subgroups with the lowest obesity prevalence (45.5-59.4 %) consisted of participants who reported living in neighborhoods with higher residential density. Among participants aged 79-89 years, the subgroup (of three distinct subgroups identified) with the lowest obesity prevalence (19.4 %) consisted of non-African American/Black participants who reported living in neighborhoods with friends or acquaintances similar in demographic characteristics to themselves. Overall support for the partitioned subgroupings was obtained using mixed model regression analysis. Conclusions: The results suggest that, in combination with race/ethnicity, features of the perceived neighborhood built and social environments differentiated distinct groups of vulnerable older adults from different age strata that differed in obesity prevalence. Pending further verification, the results may help to inform subsequent targeting of such subgroups for further investigation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier = NCT01072500

KW - Aging

KW - Disability

KW - Homophily

KW - Mobility

KW - Neighborhood

KW - Obesity

KW - Perceived environment

KW - Race/ethnicity

KW - Recursive partitioning

KW - Residential density

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U2 - 10.1186/s12966-015-0322-1

DO - 10.1186/s12966-015-0322-1

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

JF - International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

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