An osteoporosis and fracture intervention program increases the diagnosis and treatment for osteoporosis for patients with minimal trauma fractures.

Beatrice J. Edwards*, Andrew D. Bunta, Laird D. Madison, Anthony DeSantis, Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman, Lois Taft, Caroline Wilson, Maryam Moinfar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: As fewer than 25% of patients with an osteoporotic minimal trauma fracture (MTF) are evaluated and treated for osteoporosis, an osteoporosis and fracture intervention program (OFIP) was developed. METHODS: Patients hospitalized with MTF were educated about and treated for osteoporosis and were evaluated by the osteoporosis team at 6 and 12 months after discharge. Patients seen in the emergency department were given information about osteoporosis and encouraged to seek medical care at the osteoporosis office. RESULTS: While 165 patients hospitalized with an MTF participated in the OFIP, 38 patients received routine osteoporosis education. At the 6-month follow-up, in the OFIP group, 68% of patients with hip fracture and 54% of patients with non-hip fracture were taking antiresorptive medications. There was no change in treatment rate among patients receiving conventional care. CONCLUSIONS: The rates of diagnosis of osteoporosis and treatment implementation following an MTF increased when the intervention occurred at the time of hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-274
Number of pages8
JournalJoint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management

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