An ultrastructural study of central nervous system disease produced by wild type and temperature sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus

Mauro Carlo Dal Canto, S. G. Rabinowitz, T. C. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Outbred Swiss mice 3 to 4 wk of age were injected intracerebrally with wild type vesicular stomatitis virus or its temperature sensitive (ts) mutants ts 11, ts 22, ts 31, and ts 41. Brain and spinal cord were then studied for pathologic changes by electron microscopy. All mice infected with wild type vesicular stomatitis virus died within 2 days of inoculation. Diffuse ependymal alterations often culminating in necrosis in brain and especially spinal cord and rare foci of necrosis and mononuclear cell infiltration in the injected hemisphere were the main pathologic changes in these animals. In in contrast, mice infected intracerebrally with ts 22 and ts 31 showed their first clinical signs, consisting of hind limb paralysis, on day 4 and did not die until day 7 or 8 after inoculation. Ependymal alterations were of less severe degree in these animals, whereas the most striking changes were those of status spongiosus limited to the gray matter of the spinal cord. Such status spongiosus was mainly due to ballooning of dendrites and astrocytic processes, although myelin and neurons were also occasionally involved. Mice infected with ts 11 and ts 41, on the other hand, remained clinically well and failed to show significant pathologic features at 4 and 8 days after intracerebral inoculation. This study would indicate that some ts mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus are capable of altering the fulminating disease produced by the parent virus and of producing strikingly different pathologic changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-196
Number of pages12
JournalLaboratory Investigation
Volume35
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1976

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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