Analogical dialogue acts: Supporting learning by reading analogies in instructional texts

David M. Barbella*, Kenneth D Forbus

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Analogy is heavily used in instructional texts. We introduce the concept of analogical dialogue acts (ADAs), which represent the roles utterances play in instructional analogies. We describe a catalog of such acts, based on ideas from structure-mapping theory. We focus on the operations that these acts lead to while understanding instructional texts, using the Structure-Mapping Engine (SME) and dynamic case construction in a computational model. We test this model on a small corpus of instructional analogies expressed in simplified English, which were understood via a semi-automatic natural language system using analogical dialogue acts. The model enabled a system to answer questions after understanding the analogies that it was not able to answer without them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAAAI-11 / IAAI-11 - Proceedings of the 25th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 23rd Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference
Pages1429-1435
Number of pages7
StatePublished - Nov 2 2011
Event25th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 23rd Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-11 / IAAI-11 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 7 2011Aug 11 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Volume2

Other

Other25th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 23rd Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-11 / IAAI-11
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period8/7/118/11/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Artificial Intelligence

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