Analysis of myocardial motion based on velocity measurements with a black blood prepared segmented gradient-echo sequence: Methodology and applications to normal volunteers and patients

Juergen Hennig*, Britta Schneider, Simone Peschl, Michael Markl, Thomas Krause, Jörg Laubenberger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

The paper describes a strategy for measuring and characterizing myocardial motion in terms of velocity parameters derived from measurements with a segmented black blood prepared phase contrast gradient echo sequence. The characteristic parameters are calculated by transforming the velocities measured on a pixel-by-pixel basis across the left ventricle from the laboratory frame of reference into a cylindrical coordinate system, in which the motion velocities within the short axis plane are represented in polar coordinates and which is located at the center of the myocardium and moving with it over the ECG cycle. First results in a study with 12 healthy volunteers gave highly consistent values for the radial (expansion/compression) as well as the rotational velocities. Except for one volunteer, motion at the R wave of the ECG starts with clockwise rotation, followed by contraction and expansion accompanied by counterclockwise rotation. First examinations of patients with global and focal disease demonstrate the potential to detect disturbances in the local as well as the overall motion patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)868-877
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1998

Keywords

  • Heart wall motion
  • Myocardial motion
  • Phase contrast
  • Velocity mapping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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