Analysis of the effects of firing rate and synchronization on spike-triggered averaging of neuronal output

Jason J. Kutch*, Nina l Suresh, Arthur D. Kuo, William Z Rymer, Anthony M. Bloch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Spike-triggered averaging (STA) has been used experimentally to identify multiple features of neuronal output including post-synaptic potentials, whole muscle facilitation, and motor unit output. Using only the most basic assumptions, we develop equations that predict the effects of neuronal firing rate and synchronization on STA. We use exact equations to show that, if the measured neuronal output is multidimensional, then the direction of STA is unaffected by firing rate in the absence of synchronization. We then extend these equations into a framework for analyzing synchronization, and show that under reasonable conditions the analysis of synchronization can be mapped to linear algebra. We consider whether the effects of synchronization can be removed, and if there are neuronal output configurations for which STA is insensitive to synchronization. We conclude that STA can give insight into how neuronal synchronization is organized with respect to neuronal output.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 45th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control 2006, CDC
Pages2076-2081
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event45th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control 2006, CDC - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Dec 13 2006Dec 15 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control
ISSN (Print)0191-2216

Other

Other45th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control 2006, CDC
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period12/13/0612/15/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Control and Optimization

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