Anatomic explanation of mobile systolic clicks: Implications for the clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of mitral valve prolapse

Andrew J. Weis*, Ernesto E. Salcedo, William J. Stewart, Harry M. Lever, Alan L. Klein, James D. Thomas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

An echocardiogram (echo) is often ordered for suspected mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Using echo as the gold standard, we conducted a meticulous physical examination on 61 patients with this referral diagnosis. Ninety percent of patients with negative physical examination and echo results for MVP had physical examination findings likely to have been misinterpreted as MVP by the referring physician. Redundant portions of the mitral valve apparatus were found in 57% of patients with MVP on our physical examination but not on echo. A carefully performed physical examination (including dynamic auscultation) can exclude MVP. Not all mobile systolic clicks are associated with anatomic echo prolapse; they can be generated by redundant chordae tendineae and, in the absence of echo prolapse, probably by redundant leaflets. Patients with mobile systolic clicks should have an echo to determine the portion of the spectrum of echo prolapse present and to determine risk stratification and management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-320
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume129
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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