Anatomic Reduction and Next-Generation Fixation Constructs for Arthroscopic Repair of Crescent, L-Shaped, and U-Shaped Rotator Cuff Tears

Shane J. Nho*, Neil Ghodadra, Matthew T. Provencher, Stefanie Reiff, Anthony A. Romeo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emerging techniques and instrumentation have allowed orthopaedic surgeons to achieve rotator cuff repair through an all-arthroscopic technique. The most critical steps in rotator cuff repair consist of proper identification of the cuff tear pattern and anatomic restoration of the torn tendon footprint. With anatomic reduction of the rotator cuff tendons, a sound fixation construct can help restore rotator cuff contact pressure and kinematics, allowing for decreased repair tension and optimal healing potential. We provide surgical methods to recognize tear patterns and present a repair construct that will restore the anatomic footprint of the torn rotator cuff tendon. The key, initial maneuver to restore the anatomic footprint of the cuff includes placement of a suture anchor at the anterolateral corner for L-shaped tears and at the posterolateral corner for reverse L-shaped and U-shaped tears. After insertion of the medial-row anchors, the tendon stitches should be planned by use of a grasper to hold the tendon in a reduced position and guide location of the stitch. The lateral row with suture bridge can be visualized, and the final repair construct should produce an anatomic restoration of the rotator cuff footprint.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-559
Number of pages7
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Crescent tear
  • L-shaped tear
  • Rotator cuff
  • Shoulder
  • U-shaped tear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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