Angiosarcoma of the breast following segmental mastectomy complicated by lymphedema

J. A. Benda, A. S. Al-Jurf, A. B. Benson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A patient is discussed who had angiosarcoma of her lymphedematous right breast develop four years after segmental mastectomy for infiltrating ductal carcinoma. The lymphedema developed and persisted after an indolent and recurrent postoperative infection. The possibility that the second malignancy is a consequence of the chronic lymphedema, similar to the angiosarcomas of lymphedematous extremities after radical mastectomy, is cautiously entertained. This hypothesis is worthy of consideration as more more breast conservation surgery is being done, with or without adjuvant radiation therapy, and accumulating evidence suggests that lymphedema of the breast is a common complication of surgery followed by radiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)651-655
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume87
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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Lymphedema
Segmental Mastectomy
Hemangiosarcoma
Breast
Radical Mastectomy
Ductal Carcinoma
Second Primary Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Extremities
Radiation
Infection
Angiosarcoma of the breast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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Angiosarcoma of the breast following segmental mastectomy complicated by lymphedema. / Benda, J. A.; Al-Jurf, A. S.; Benson, A. B.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 87, No. 5, 01.01.1987, p. 651-655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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