Antibiotic prescribing for respiratory infections at retail clinics, physician practices, and emergency departments

Ateev Mehrotra*, Courtney A. Gidengil, Claude M. Setodji, Rachel M. Burns, Jeffrey A. Linder

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To compare antibiotic prescribing among retail clinics, primary care practices, and emergency departments (EDs) for acute respiratory infections (ARIs): antibiotics-may-be-appropriate ARIs (eg, sinusitis) and antibiotics-never-appropriate ARIs (eg, acute bronchitis). Study Design: We analyzed retail clinic data from the electronic health records of the 3 largest retail clinic chains in the United States, and data on visits to primary care practices and EDs from the nationally representative National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Methods: Using multivariate models, we estimated an adjusted antibiotic prescribing rate for each site of care, controlling for differences in patient characteristics and diagnosis. Results: From 2007 to 2009 in the United States, there were 3 million, 167 million, and 29 million ARI visits at retail clinics, primary care practices, and EDs, respectively. For all ARI visits, the adjusted antibiotic prescribing rate at retail clinics (58%) was similar to the rate at primary care practices (62%; P = .09) and EDs (59%; P = .48). For antibiotics-may-be-appropriate ARI visits, the adjusted antibiotic prescribing rate (95%) at retail clinics was higher than at primary care practices (85%; P <.01) and EDs (83%; P <.01). For antibiotics-never-appropriate ARI visits, the adjusted antibiotic prescribing rate (34%) at retail clinics was lower than at primary care practices (51%; P <.01) and EDs (48%; P <.01). Conclusions: Compared with primary care practices and EDs, there was no difference at retail clinics in overall ARI antibiotic prescribing. At retail clinics, antibiotic prescribing was more diagnosis-appropriate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-302
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Volume21
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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