Antibiotic resistance and mecA characterization of Staphylococcus hominis from filarial lymphedema patients in the Ahanta West District, Ghana: A cross-sectional study

Priscilla Kini, Solomon Wireko, Priscilla Osei-Poku, Samuel O. Asiedu, Emmanuel K.A. Amewu, Ebenezer Asiedu, Ernest Amanor, Caleb Mensah, Mary B. Wilson, Amma Larbi, Kennedy G. Boahen, Augustina A. Sylverken, Katherine R. Amato, Alexander Kwarteng*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Aim: Filarial infections affect over 150 million people in the tropics. One of the major forms of filarial pathologies is lymphedema; a condition where the immune response is significantly altered, resulting in changes in the normal flora. Staphylococcus hominis, a human skin commensal, can also be pathogenic in immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, there is the possibility that S. hominis could assume a different behavior in filarial lymphedema patients. To this end, we investigated the levels of antibiotic resistance and extent of mecA gene carriage in S. hominis among individuals presenting with filarial lymphedema in rural Ghana. Method: We recruited 160 individuals with stages I–VII lymphedema, in a cross-sectional study in the Ahanta West District of the Western Region of Ghana. Swabs from lymphedematous limb ulcers, pus, and cutaneous surfaces were cultured using standard culture-based techniques. The culture isolates were subjected to Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for bacterial identification. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the Kirby–Bauer method. mecA genes were targeted by polymerase chain reaction for strains that were cefoxitin resistant. Results: In all, 112 S. hominis were isolated. The AST results showed resistance to chloramphenicol (87.5%), tetracycline (83.3%), penicillin (79.2%), and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (45.8%). Of the 112 strains of S. hominis, 51 (45.5%) were resistant to cefoxitin, and 37 (72.5%) of the cefoxitin-resistant S. hominis haboured the mecA gene. Conclusion: This study indicates a heightened level of methicillin-resistant S. hominis isolated among filarial lymphedema patients. As a result, opportunistic infections of S. hominis among the already burdened filarial lymphedema patients in rural Ghana may have reduced treatment success with antibiotics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1104
JournalHealth Science Reports
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Ghana
  • Staphylococcus hominis
  • antibiotics
  • filarial lymphedema
  • mecA gene
  • resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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