Antiplatelet Medications and Biomarkers of Hemostasis May Explain the Association of Hematoma Appearance and Subsequent Hematoma Expansion After Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Mengxuan Tang, Hye Jung Shin, William Metcalf-Doetsch, Yuan Luo, Paul F. Lindholm, Hau Kwaan, Andrew M. Naidech*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: To test the hypothesis that appearances of intracranial hematomas on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) are not idiosyncratic and reflect a biologically plausible mechanism, we evaluated the association between hematoma appearance on CT, biomarkers of platelet activity, and antiplatelet or anticoagulant medication use prior to admission. Methods: We studied 330 consecutively identified patients from 2006 to 2019. Biomarkers of platelet activity (platelet aspirin assay) and medication history (aspirin, clopidogrel) were prospectively recorded on admission. A blinded interpreter recorded the presence of hematoma appearances from the diagnostic scan. Associations were tested with parametric or nonparametric statistics, as appropriate. Results: The black hole sign (101, 30%) was most prevalent, followed by the island sign (57, 17%) and blend sign (32, 10%). There was reduced platelet activity in patients with a black hole sign (511 [430–610] vs. 562 [472–628] aspirin reaction units, P = 0.01) or island sign (505 [434–574] vs. 559 [462–629] aspirin reaction units, P = 0.004). Clopidogrel use prior to admission was associated with the black hole sign (odds ratio 2.25, 95% confidence interval 1.02–4.98, P = 0.04). Conclusions: In patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage, hematoma appearances on CT are associated with biomarkers of platelet activity and clopidogrel use prior to admission. Appearances of intracranial hematomas on CT may reflect reduced hemostasis from antiplatelet medication use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurocritical Care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • Hemostasis
  • Intracerebral hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

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