Application of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ECSWL) in orthopaedics. II. Dose-response and pressure distribution measurements.

J. B. Park*, S. H. Park, James Neil Weinstein, S. Loening, D. Oster

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

In order to apply the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ECSWL) technique to the loosening of the bone-cement interface for the extraction of the cement during revision arthroplasty it is essential to know the dose-response characteristics. The present study shows that the number of shocks needed to break the interface between a 2- and 6-mm-thick bovine femoral bone and bone cement is similar to the fatigue behavior of a material, that is, Log(N) = C(kV) + D, where N is the number of shock impulses, kV is the power setting of the lithotripter machine in kilovolts, and C and D are constants. Iso-pressure distribution of the traveling shock wave front through a simulated bone in a Plexiglass tube using Fuji pressure film showed quantitative pressure contours from which one can understand the effective area of shock wave and its distribution. The most effective area of the shock wave was about 1.5 cm in diameter at 23 and 25 kV with pressure at least 7.0 MPa which is more than sufficient to break the bone-cement interface in tension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-170
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of applied biomaterials : an official journal of the Society for Biomaterials
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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