Application of thrombin based fibrin glue and non-thrombin based batroxobin glue on intact human blood vessels: Evidence for transmural thrombin activity

William H. Dascombe, Gregory Dumanian, Chull Hong, Brian V. Heil, Karyn Labadie, Birgit Hessel, Birger Blombäck, Peter C. Johnson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

An alternative method of uniting small diameter vessels to obtain tissue union while limiting the thrombogenic effect of suture placement at a vessel anastomosis involves the use of a thrombin based fibrin glue as a surgical sealant. This investigation addresses whether the in vitro application of a thrombin based glue (TG), or batroxobin glue (BG), a non-thrombin based glue made with the snake venom enzyme batroxobin, alters intravascular platelet deposition (PD) or cleaves blood fibrinogen, as measured by fibrinopeptide A (FPA) production, when the respective glue is applied to the external surface of an intact human placental artery or an artery with an anastomosis. When TG was applied to the adventitial surface of an intact vessel or an anastomosis (n = 7) of control and experimental vessels, there was a significant increase in intraluminal platelet deposition, an effect not realized with BG (n = 12, intact vessel TG p = 0.01, BG p = 0.66, anastomosis TG p < 0.01, BG p < 0.01). Both TG and BG significantly increased FPA levels when human whole blood was perfused through both intact vessels or vessels containing an anastomosis when compared to control vessels (intact vessel TG and BG p < 0.01, anastomosis TG and BG p < 0.01). Labelled thrombin studies document the rapid passage of thrombin through an intact vessel wall or vessels with an anastomosis when TG was applied to the adventitial surface of the vessel. The data suggest that TG and BG are drug delivery systems for their respective enzymes that either pass through or transfer a message across not only a surgically created anastomosis, but also an intact vessel wall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)947-951
Number of pages5
JournalThrombosis and Haemostasis
Volume78
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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